Skip to main content

Nursing: Health Statistics

Connect directly to a wide variety of resources to support your clinical and research needs.

When You're Looking for Statistics, Keep in Mind...

Data and statistics can be difficult to search for.  It's helpful to think about the following when you're searching for this kind of information:

It takes time to collect, analyze, and publish data.  Sometimes the most recent available data is a few years old.

National and state data are more prevalent than city/town data.  

Sometimes you'll find published data sets, which contain raw, unanalyzed data.  See the Tips for Searching Google box on this page for help finding analyzed, ready-to-use statistics.

Data can be taken out of context, cherry-picked, or manipulated to support a particular point of view.  If you're not sure you can trust a source, try to verify the information in a second source.

Best Bets for Health Statistics

Tips for Searching Google for Statistics

You'll find some "best bets" for finding demographic and health statistics below.  You'll probably save yourself some time by searching these first.  But if you can't still find the information you're looking for, see what you can find by searching Google.

These tips will help you do a more effective Google search:

Look for sites that end in .gov.  City and town websites have lots of local demographic and health information.

If you find a .org site, look into the organization.  Would they have any reason to present biased information?

Look for reports, overviews, and snapshots when you're looking for quick facts.  You'll need a lot of time (and probably some advanced tools and knowledge) to find the information you want in a data set.

If you find a source that cites data from somewhere else, try to find the original source.

Pay attention to when data was collected.  A report published this year could cite data that's much older.

Best Bets for Demographic Statistics

Citing Statistics Sources

How you cite your sources will depend on where you found the information.  The Purdue OWL website and the APA Style Blog have lots of examples of how to cite different types of sources.
 

Reports

To cite a report that you found online, use the "Non-Periodical Web Document or Report" example on the Purdue OWL website.  If no specific authors are named, you can use the name of the publishing organization instead (i.e. U.S. Census Bureau).

Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Date of publication). Title of document. Retrieved from http://Web address

Organization Name. (Date of publication). Title of document. Retrieved from http://Web address
 

Charts, Tables, Infographics, etc.

To cite a chart/table/infographic that you found online, use the "Graphic Data" example on the Purdue OWL website.  Again, use the organization name if no specific authors are listed.

Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Date of publication). [Description of figure]. Title of document. Retrieved from http://Web address

Organization Name. (Date of publication). [Description of figure]. Title of document. Retrieved from http://Web address

Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment. (2007). [Graph illustration the SORCE Spectral Plot May 8, 2008]. Solar Spectral Data Access from the SIM, SOLSTICE, and XPS Instruments. Retrieved from http://lasp.colorado.edu/cgi-bin/ion-p?page=input_data_for_ spectra.ion